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Hibachi Noodles (Japanese Steakhouse Noodles)

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A trip to a hibachi restaurant is usually a fun time. You can never go wrong with a hearty helping of excellent Hibachi Noodles, regardless of your entrée. This Japanese-inspired dish is composed with yakisoba noodles, Teriyaki sauce, brown sugar and sesame oil. Serve with shrimp, chicken, beef, or plant-based alternatives.

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Hibachi Noodles

Make these restaurant-quality vegan Hibachi Noodles at home in just 15 minutes! Noodles are mixed in a garlic and umami-laden sauce, resulting in a deliciously rich and indulgent supper in no time.

Just like your favorite hibachi restaurant, but even better! With their buttery richness, rich umami, mild sweetness, and, of course, the garlic and ginger, these savory hibachi noodles hit all the right notes.

This dish is simple yet exquisite, and the sauce, which includes Kikkoman® Soy Sauce, makes it a true weekday winner, particularly when you want a low-mess, 20-minute meal.

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Hibachi Noodles

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Hibachi noodles are traditionally cooked with noodles, a sweet sauce comprised of soy sauce, teriyaki, sugar, and maybe lemon juice. The dish is then garnished with sesame oil, sesame seeds, and green onions. But I wanted to transform this incredible flavor profile into a full meal. So I added some of my favorite vegetables.

These umami-packed noodles are full of Asian flavor that you’ll enjoy and make an excellent side dish or complete dinner to which you may add protein if desired.

WHAT EXACTLY IS HIBACHI?

The name “Hibachi-style” cuisine comes from the portable Japanese cooking equipment, the hibachi grill. This barbecue is charcoal-fueled and has heat-resistant grates on top. While the word “hibachi-style” is commonly used to describe the manner of cooking found in many Japanese-American steakhouses (on a big electric griddle), such as Benihana, the official term is “teppanyaki grilling.”

Teppanyaki grilling chefs will slice and dice on a heated griddle as customers sit around the cook top. Hibachi noodles are normally stir-fried on the griddle, but this creative variation avoids this step in favor of a quick stovetop technique.

WHAT DO HIBACHI NOODLES MEAN?

Yakisoba noodles are used to make hibachi noodles. These noodles resemble a thicker, longer version of ramen and are a staple in Japanese cuisine. Wheat-based yakisoba noodles are frequently served stir-fried. In fact, the Japanese term “yakisoba” roughly translates to “fried noodles.”

These noodles become hibachi noodles when simmered in a sweet umami sauce and stir-fried in butter.

Alternative Video Recipe: Hibachi Noodles Recipe

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WHAT TYPES OF NOODLES ARE SUITABLE FOR HIBACHI?

Yakisoba noodles are traditionally used to make hibachi noodles. This is a long, flat wheat flour noodle. If you can’t locate yakisoba in your area, use any other long wheat, rice, or gluten-free noodles you like.

INGREDIENTS YOU’LL NEED

  • Yakisoba Noodles, Udon, Ramen or Linguini (see note)
  • Unsalted Butter
  • Garlic
  • Soy Sauce
  • Teriyaki Sauce
  • Granulated sugar, or Brown Sugar
  • Asian Sesame Oil
  • Sesame Seeds or Green Onions, for garnish
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Hibachi Noodles (Japanese Steakhouse Noodles) 20

HOW TO MAKE HIBACHI NOODLES

  1. In a skillet or wok, melt the butter over medium heat.
  2. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, approximately 30 seconds.
  3. Pour the soy sauce, teriyaki sauce, and sugar into the pan, and stir until the sugar has completely dissolved.
  4. Add the cooked noodles and toss them in the pan mixture until they are completely coated. Then, add the Asian sesame oil and continue mixing well by tossing.
  5. Add sesame seeds as a garnish.
  6. Add the green onions to complete the garnish, and serve immediately.

TIPS AND TRICKS FOR MAKING HIBACHI NOODLES

  • Utilize a premium soy sauce: This is not the time to buy soy sauce on sale! Use a high-quality brand like San-J or Kikkoman and a low-sodium variety if you prefer a less salty sauce. Check out the Yondu brand for a high-quality, plant-based umami sauce.
  • Ensure the pasta is al dente: Here, nothing is worse than soggy noodles. If you are cooking noodles yourself, they should be al dente before you stop cooking.
  • Serve warm: The noodles have the best flavor when they are served straight from the pan.

NOTES ON INGREDIENTS

  • Noodles – To make this recipe as genuine as possible, look for yakisoba noodles at Asian markets or in the International section of big supermarkets. Otherwise, you can substitute spaghetti, linguine, ramen, or udon noodles.
  • Don’t skip the vegan butter! The base of the hibachi noodle sauce is melted vegan butter and garlic, which is the secret to making this noodle dish so rich and decadent.
  • Hibachi noodle sauce – This simple sauce is made with a few sweet, salty, and umami-tasting components. It can easily be made gluten-free by substituting tamari for the soy sauce.

WHAT KIND OF NOODLES ARE USED IN HIBACHI?

Yakisoba is a common type of Japanese noodle employed in hibachi cooking. These wheat-flour-based noodles have a flavor profile reminiscent of Worcestershire sauce. Yakisoba noodles are frequently available at Japanese food trucks and restaurants. To prepare Hibachi noodles, these tender noodles are cooked in butter, garlic, and a sweet umami sauce.

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Hibachi Noodles (Japanese Steakhouse Noodles) 21

HOW TO SERVE HIBACHI NOODLES?

In all honesty, these noodles are delicious enough to stand on their own. A large bowl of hot hibachi noodles can be a scrumptious way to stave off the munchies. These noodles pair well with chicken, beef, and shrimp. Broccoli and carrots or mushrooms are available as vegetarian options.

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WHAT SAUCE DOES HIBACHI USE?

The essence of Hibachi is the combination of sweet and umami flavors. To achieve this level of deliciousness, teriyaki sauce and soy sauce must be combined. This irresistible sauce’s flavor is heightened by butter, garlic, and brown sugar.

ARE HIBACHI NOODLES VEGAN?

Yakisoba noodles are wheat-based and vegan-friendly. You can make this recipe 100 percent vegan if you use only plant-based ingredients (such as butter).

ARE HIBACHI NOODLES GLUTEN-FREE?

Authentic yakisoba noodles are made from 100% buckwheat and are therefore naturally gluten-free. Despite having “wheat” in its name, buckwheat is a gluten-free grain that can be substituted for rice. Thanks to this super ingredient, not only are hibachi noodles delicious, but they are also guilt-free and gluten-free.

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TEPPANYAKI AND HIBACHI COOKING?

If hibachi grilling is performed over a grate, how are the popular Japanese steakhouses prepared? Teppanyaki-style cooking involves cooking on a flat iron griddle surface over an open flame (typically fueled by propane). Both styles involve cooking food over an open flame, but hibachi grilling is performed on a grate while teppanyaki grilling is performed on a griddle.

STORING & REHEATING

Refrigerate any leftover hibachi noodles for up to three days in an airtight container. They are best when consumed within the first two days, so I do not recommend serving them after two days in the refrigerator.

REHEATING LEFTOVER HIBACHI NOODLES

The best way to reheat hibachi noodles is over a stovetop burner (as well as pretty much any take-out or homemade Chinese or Japanese style foods). Using a large skillet or wok heated over high heat and a touch of my hibachi cooking oil, toss the noodles for two minutes, or until thoroughly heated.

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Hibachi Noodles

SUBSTITUTIONS

If you want vegetarian hibachi noodles, omit the shrimp and top with your favorite Asian vegetables, such as broccoli, baby corn, snap peas, and bok choy. Also excellent with tofu.

Not a fan of shrimp? Use your preferred protein, such as chicken, pig, or beef. Make sure to cut them thinly so they cook quickly.

HOW TO MAKE SHRIMP HIBACHI NOODLES

  • In a small mixing bowl, blend brown sugar or honey, soy sauce, and teriyaki sauce until well combined; leave aside.
  • The pasta will then be cooked in a big pot/Dutch oven, drained, and set away.
  • Sauté the vegetables and shrimp in the same pan/pot.
  • Add the garlic and sauté for a few seconds before adding the spaghetti noodles and tossing everything together with tongs.
  • Toss in the sauce mixture and heat until it begins to boil.
  • Take off the heat and serve! To add some heat, drizzle with Sriracha sauce.
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HIBACHI NOODLES (JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE NOODLES)


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  • Author: Emily Roselyn
  • Prep Time: 5 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 15 Minutes
  • Yield: 6 1x

Description

A trip to a hibachi restaurant is usually a fun time. You can never go wrong with a hearty helping of excellent Hibachi Noodles, regardless of your entree. This Japanese-inspired dish is composed with yakisoba noodles, Teriyaki sauce, brown sugar and sesame oil. Serve with shrimp, chicken, beef, or plant-based alternatives.


Ingredients

Scale

Hibachi Noodles

  • 1 lb. cooked yakisoba noodles or udon or ramen or linguini (see note)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon garlic minced
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon teriyaki sauce
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar or brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Asian sesame oil
  • optional sesame seeds and chopped green onions for garnish

 


Instructions

  1. If required, cook the noodles according to the package guidelines.
  2. Place a skillet or wok over medium-high heat. When the butter and garlic are heated, add them. Sauté for 30 seconds, or until aromatic.
  3. To the pan, add the soy sauce, teriyaki sauce, and sugar. Stir for about 30 seconds to properly dissolve the sugar.
  4. Toss in the cooked noodles using kitchen tongs to coat completely.
  5. Drizzle the sesame oil over the top and toss a few more times.
  6. Optional garnishes include sesame seeds and chopped green onions. Serve immediately as is or with meals such as hibachi veggies, hibachi chicken, or hibachi steak.

Notes

  • Yakisoba are buckwheat noodles that can be found at Asian grocery stores and online. If you can’t find any, udon noodles are the next best thing, followed by ramen. If that fails, you can substitute linguini, but you’ll need to prepare it first.
  • Sesame oil: Instead of refined sesame oil, use Asian sesame oil derived from toasted sesame seeds.
  • Heat a nonstick skillet or wok over medium-high heat to reheat hibachi noodles. When it’s hot, add one tablespoon of water, then the noodles. Stir fry for 1 to 2 minutes, or until boiling hot, before serving.
  • Category: main course,
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Japanese

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 6
  • Calories: 0kcal
  • Sugar: 11.5g
  • Sodium: 406.4mg
  • Fat: 1.2g
  • Saturated Fat: 0g
  • Unsaturated Fat: 0g
  • Trans Fat: 0g
  • Carbohydrates: 68.5g
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Protein: 11.3g
  • Cholesterol: 0g

Keywords: Noodles, Hibachi Noodles, Japanese steakhouse noodles

FAQs About Hibachi Noodles

In hibachi, what kind of noodles are used?

Hibachi noodles image result
Yakisoba noodles are commonly used to make Hibachi Noodles. If you have Ramen or Udon Noodles on hand, you may also use those!

In a Japanese restaurant, what are the noodles called?

Noodles are a common ingredient in Japanese cuisine. They are frequently served cold with dipping sauces, as well as in soups and hot foods.

What is the distinction between lo mein noodles and hibachi noodles?

In actuality, there is essentially no difference between Hibachi and lo mein, save that the latter is manufactured in China and the former in Japan (spaghetti is not included in the comparison).

What do you call thick Japanese noodles?

Udon () are thick wheat flour noodles from Japan. They are thicker, whiter, and chewier than soba noodles. Udon is widely offered in Japanese restaurants in a variety of hot and cold dishes.

More Alternative Noodles Recipes to Try!

SPICY BRAISED EGGPLANT NOODLES

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SPICY BRAISED EGGPLANT NOODLES

This weeknight noodle dish uses gochujang, miso, and tomato paste for deep flavor in no time. Long, slender Japanese and Chinese eggplant cook faster and get more tender than their globe-shaped cousins.

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CHICKEN AND MUSHROOM SAUCED NOODLES WITH THAI BASIL

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CHICKEN AND MUSHROOM SAUCED NOODLES WITH THAI BASIL

In many Chinese noodle shops, you can choose between soup noodles and sauced noodles. While I normally prefer soup noodles during cold weather, there is something incredibly comforting about sauced noodles, where each strand is coated in a complex, savory sauce that imparts flavor to the entire dish.

This recipe, with its thick gravy, umami mushrooms, and garlicky chicken, has all of the qualities I seek in sauced noodles: heat, sweetness, and savory flavor, all of which are brought out by the layering of flavors.

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